Soft bread in the Thermomix is possible!

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Bread was the most frustrating thing to make in the Thermomix. It would always be dense, doughy and too heavy. It was edible but it was nothing like the lovely soft fluffy bread you can purchase at the supermarket or bakery.

After a lot of experimenting I have found a few tricks to ensure the end result is soft and fluffy. These tips can also come in handy if experimenting with other types or doughs where the final products is a little denser intentionally.

My new (daggy) catchphase is “Bake it til you make it!”. Making good quality bread and bread products is an art. It takes a lot of experimenting, knowing your ingredients and method as well as knowing your oven to create great bread. Don’t be disheartened if your first few attempts are flops. I lost count of how many loaves I got wrong before I starting getting them right. Lets just say my freezer was well stocked with breadcrumbs made from the unsuccessful attempts.

I’m not a bread expert at all and do not want to give the impression that I am. I have just found that this combination works for us and how we like our bread with help from a variety of resources including bakers. 

Know your ingredients

  • Bakers flour or “strong flour” is essential. It is a high protein flour designed specifically for making bread and doughs so will give you a much better end result. Use good flour. Your bread will be only as good as the ingredients that go in to it. Flours can vary from brand to brand so you many need to experiment and see what gives you the better result.
  • You can purchase a variety of gluten free flours for bread making (or make your own). Its important to know that each brand differs in what makes up their GF flour as there is no one universal recipe. If one brand doesn’t work for you try another. Different ingredients will give different results.
  • Real bread has only four ingredients – strong flour, water, yeast and salt. Anything else is seen as an “improver”. I used to swear by store bought bread improver but have been able to make great bread without it as long as I kneaded and proofed as directed further down. I have read that a lot of people prefer not to use bread improver and will use dissolved vitamin c tablets or chia seeds as a bread improver. I have not tried these. Its worth noting that there are some really good bread improvers on the market now. Your local health food shop or online bulk foods sites stock a great range and can walk you through each brand. 
  • At a recent cooking class I learnt that fresh yeast makes for a lighter and more elastic dough. Fresh yeast will give the bread a better result once baked and taste much better. If you can find this I recommend using it over dried yeast however it can be hard to source and can sometimes be a little expensive for everyday baking. Note: Fresh yeast has a short shelf life. Ensure you store it correctly.
  • When using dried yeast, always store it in the fridge or freezer.
  • Ensure the yeast is active otherwise your dough will not rise. To test: add 1 teaspoon sugar to 1/4 cup warm water. Add a teas of yeast to it and let it stand for 10 minutes. If the yeast foams the yeast is active. If it doesn’t you need to discard and buy new yeast.
  • Temperature of water is important. I always use lukewarm regardless of what the recipe says. If its too cold the yeast wont activate and hot water kills yeast. Room temperature water is always a safe bet. You can heat your water in the tmx to 37 degrees before adding the remaining ingredients if desired. Do not  go over 37 degrees.
  • If you live in areas with very hard water, boil the water first and cool to 37 degrees before using.Salt
  • Salt in a natural flavour booster and is essential in bread. I’ve learnt that it also helps the flour absorb the water. Without salt your dough will be stickier then normal. How interesting is that!
  • We often believe that it is important salt and yeast do not come into contact with each other.  This is generally only true for fresh yeast as the salt can break down the properties and structure of fresh yeast causing it to deactivate. To be on the cautious side I ensure yeast and salt don’t come into contact regardless if its dried or fresh.
  • I always add my ingredients in this order: water, yeast, oil, flour, salt and other flavourings.

The importance of kneading

  • We don’t knead enough. A lot of thermo cooker recipes call for 2 minutes of kneading. This really isn’t enough time to get the gluten working and stretched. Kneading is extremely important as it helps activate the gluten in the bread. You are wanting a nice elastic dough. To get this you knead to knead it – see what I did there?! Genius.
  • I always knead the dough for 6-8 minutes regardless of what the recipe says.  Bakers will knead for 10-15 minutes minimum.
  • You know your dough has been kneaded enough when it has a lovely smooth finish to it. You want it to hold its shape and once poked you want it to bounce back into shape quickly. It should pull away nicely from the sides of the bowl and not sticking.
  • A good way to test if your dough has been kneaded enough is what many bakers call the “Window test”. You should be able to stretch your dough so thinly you can see light through it without it tearing.

Rise and shine!

  • Place the ball of dough into a lightly oiled bowl covered with cling film or in a bread mat to rise.
  • When leaving dough to rise, ensure the area it is rising in isn’t too hot. It can kill the yeast and cause the dough  to collapse during the cooking process.
  • I leave the dough to rise in my car or in a warm room for at least an hour minimum or until well and truly doubled.
  • Once your dough has doubled in size, knock it down with your hands to release some of the gases that have built up in the rising stage.
  • I then shape it into my desired shape or place in to my tin, cover to avoid a skin from forming and let rise once again for what is known as a second rise. This can be anywhere from 15-60  minutes. You want it to double in size.
  • It’s not uncommon for my dough to rise for two or more hours when days get busy. These are always the lightest and fluffiest loaves/rolls. Please see the below note however.
  • I have read quite a bit about over proofing. This has never occurred for me and I sometimes leave dough for many hours. To ensure you don’t over proof, cook your dough once it has doubled in size after the second rise. Do not let it rise more than double. If you feel you have over proofed the dough, knock it down, reshape it and let it rise again until double. This should rectify it.
  • At a recent cooking class I learnt that gluten free flours and wholemeal/grain flours need a longer proofing time. They will need almost double the time compared to white doughs. 
  • You can place dough straight into the fridge from the tmx. Place it into the fridge in a flat disc shape. This ensures it cools evenly in the fridge and rises evenly. When you are ready to cook with it, remove it from the fridge and place it back into the tmx bowl. Knead for 6-8 mins and then let prove as above.
  • Ive read a lot that its best to put straight into a hot oven rather than a cold oven and letting it get to temperature. This will allow for an even bake and crust to form. See below tip.

Bake it til you make it!

  • When baking the bread, you can place an oven proof dish filled with water at the bottom of the oven for the first 15 minutes. The first 15 minutes is where the bread does most of its expanding. You could just spray some water into the hot oven using a spray bottle. Either way will work. The steam helps the bread form a nice even rise and crunchy crust. This will help your bread from bursting or uneven top.
  • Make sure you cook the loaf/rolls long enough. Doughy loaves or rolls are often because the bread hasn’t been cooked long enough. If your bread resembles scones or damper pop it back into the oven for longer. It should sound hollow when tapped on the bottom if cooked through.
  • If you want a crunchy crust around the entire loaf, once cooked remove dough from tin and place onto the oven rack for 10 minutes to crisp up the base and sides.
  • Remember that each oven does vary. You may need to experiment with temperatures to see exactly how your oven cooks.

Storing your hard work

  • Fresh bread goes stale very quickly as it doesn’t contain any preservatives. Store the bread in an airtight container in the pantry and eat on the day of baking or the next day. You can freeze bread for one month.

Troubleshooting

  • Too dense and doughy: It may be undercooked. Pop it back in the oven to cook  a little longer. Other factors can be that it wasn’t kneaded and proofed enough.
  • Bread isn’t rising: Your yeast may be dead. Use the steps above to test it.
  • Bland in taste: You may have missed adding salt.
  • Crust bursts: Oven may be too hot or heating unevenly. I find in some oven I have to regularly turn the tin or tray once the crust has formed.
  • Bread collapsed when baking: You dough most likely over proofed.
  • Crust is too soft and pale: Your bread may be undercooked. Your oven may not have been not hot enough as well. 

 

 My go to recipes

 

My go to bread recipe - 1 large loaf/10 bread rolls/family sized pull apart/scrolls
This makes 1 large loaf/10 bread rolls/family sized pull apart. I use this bread recipe for all my loaves, rolls and pull aparts. It is so versatile.
Print
Prep Time
2 hr 10 min
Cook Time
40 min
Total Time
2 hr 50 min
Prep Time
2 hr 10 min
Cook Time
40 min
Total Time
2 hr 50 min
Dough
  1. 450g lukewarm water
  2. 750g bakers flour
  3. 3 teaspoons yeast
  4. 1 teaspoon of salt
  5. 3 teaspoons of bread improver, optional
Instructions
  1. Add the ingredients in this order: water, yeast, flour, improver, salt.
  2. Blitz on speed 7 for 10 seconds to roughly combine.
  3. Knead for 6 mins.
  4. Remove dough and place into a lightly oiled bowl. Cover with cling film and place into a warm spot. I use the front seat of my car or a warmed oven.
  5. Leave this to rise for approximately an hour or until doubled.
  6. Remove dough from bowl, knock out the air by shaping your dough into a free form loaf, rolls or placing it in to the desired tin.
  7. Allow to rise for another 30-40 minutes or until almost doubled in size.
  8. Preheat oven to 180 degrees.
  9. Bake for approximately 30 minutes.
The Road to Loving My Thermo Mixer http://www.trtlmt.com.au/
 
My go to bread recipe - family sized loaf
Print
Prep Time
2 hr 20 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
2 hr 50 min
Prep Time
2 hr 20 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
2 hr 50 min
Dough
  1. 220g lukewarm water
  2. 375g bakers flour
  3. 1.5 teaspoons yeast
  4. 1 teaspoon of salt
  5. 1.5 teaspoons of bread improver, optional
Instructions
  1. Add the ingredients in this order: water, yeast, flour, improver, salt.
  2. Blitz on speed 7 for 10 seconds to roughly combine.
  3. Knead for 6 mins.
  4. Remove dough and place into a lightly oiled bowl. Cover with cling film and place into a warm spot. I use the front seat of my car or a warmed oven.
  5. Leave this to rise for approximately an hour or until doubled.
  6. Remove dough from bowl, knock out the air by shaping your dough or placing it in to the desired tin.
  7. Allow to rise for another 30 minutes or until almost doubled in size.
  8. Preheat oven to 180 degrees.
  9. Bake for approximately 30 minutes.
The Road to Loving My Thermo Mixer http://www.trtlmt.com.au/
 
6 Seed Bread
This recipe yields one family sized loaf. You can double it for two loaves or a very large loaf using a bigger bread tin.
Print
Prep Time
2 hr 20 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
2 hr 50 min
Prep Time
2 hr 20 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
2 hr 50 min
Dough
  1. 220g lukewarm water
  2. 375g bakers flour
  3. 1.5 teaspoons yeast
  4. 1 teaspoon of salt
  5. 1.5 teaspoons of bread improver, optional
  6. 1 tablespoon of chia seeds
  7. 1 tablespoon poppy seeds
  8. 1 tablespoon seseme seeds
  9. 1 tablespoon flaxseeds
  10. 3 tablespoons each of pepitas and sunflower seeds
Seed coating, optional
  1. 1 tablespoon of chia seeds
  2. 1 tablespoon poppy seeds
  3. 1 tablespoon seseme seeds
  4. 1 tablespoon flaxseeds
  5. 2 tablespoons each of pepitas and sunflower seeds
Instructions
  1. Add the water, yeast, flour, improver and salt in that order.
  2. Blitz on speed 7 for 10 seconds to roughly combine.
  3. Knead for 6 mins.
  4. In the last 30 seconds add the seeds.
  5. Remove dough and place into a lightly oiled bowl. Cover with cling film and place into a warm spot. I use the front seat of my car or a warmed oven.
  6. Leave this to rise for approximately an hour or until doubled.
  7. Remove dough from bowl, knock out the air by shaping your dough into a loaf shape.
  8. Combine coating seeds on a plate and roll your dough in them.
  9. Place the dough in to a bread tin and sprinkle over any remaining seeds from the plate.
  10. Allow to rise for another 30-45 minutes in the tin. Due to the seeds, the second rise needs to be a little longer than a traditional white loaf.
  11. Preheat oven to 180 degrees.
  12. Bake for approximately 30-45 minutes.
  13. You can check it is cooked by tapping the bottom of the loaf and hearing a hollow sound.
The Road to Loving My Thermo Mixer http://www.trtlmt.com.au/
 
Soft Fluffy Bread Rolls
Serves 7
Print
Prep Time
2 hr
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
2 hr 30 min
Prep Time
2 hr
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
2 hr 30 min
Dough
  1. 220g lukewarm water
  2. 375g bakers flour
  3. 1.5 teaspoons yeast
  4. 1 teaspoon of salt
  5. 1.5 teaspoons of bread improver, optional
Optional
  1. Milk or egg, lightly beaten
  2. Sesame seeds
Instructions
  1. Add the ingredients in this order: water, yeast, flour, improver, salt.
  2. Blitz on speed 7 for 10 seconds to roughly combine.
  3. Knead for 6 mins.
  4. Remove dough and place into a lightly oiled bowl. Cover with cling film and place into a warm spot. I use the front seat of my car or a warmed oven.
  5. Leave this to rise for approximately an hour or until doubled.
  6. Remove dough from bowl, knock out the air by shaping your dough into 7 bread rolls.
  7. Place them onto a lined tin in a flower formation (one roll in the middle and 6 around it) ensuring they slightly touch.
  8. Brush with a little milk or egg wash and sesame seeds.
  9. Allow to rise until almost doubled in size.
  10. Preheat oven to 180 degrees.
  11. Bake for approximately 30-40 minutes.
The Road to Loving My Thermo Mixer http://www.trtlmt.com.au/
 
My go to pizza recipe - 2 large bases
You can halve this recipe for two smaller sized bases or up to six very thin bases.
Print
Dough
  1. 220g lukewarm water
  2. 375g bakers flour
  3. 1.5 teaspoons yeast
  4. 1 teaspoon of salt
  5. 1 tablespoon of oil
Instructions
  1. Add the ingredients in this order: water, oil, yeast, flour, salt.
  2. Blitz on speed 7 for 10 seconds to roughly combine.
  3. Knead for 6 mins.
  4. Remove dough and place into a lightly oiled bowl. Cover with cling film and place into a warm spot. I use the front seat of my car or a warmed oven.
  5. Leave this to rise for approximately an hour or until doubled.
  6. Remove dough from bowl, knock out the air by shaping your dough into pizza bases.
  7. Allow to rise for another 30 minutes, ensuring it is covered with some cling film or bread mat or top immediately and bake.
  8. Preheat oven to 180 degrees.
  9. Bake for approximately 20 minutes or until cooked to your liking.
The Road to Loving My Thermo Mixer http://www.trtlmt.com.au/
 
By | 2017-06-12T11:23:46+00:00 January 4th, 2014|Categories: Bread, Featured, Hints|41 Comments

About the Author:

Peta
Peta is a mum to three gorgeous and very energetic young boys. She loves everyday food that is achievable for a busy family, and has a passion for involving children in cooking.

41 Comments

  1. Kristin Pearce January 9, 2014 at 8:38 am - Reply

    Great advice… Trying a batch tonight. Your recipe doesn’t say how much oil ?

  2. The Bush Gourmand February 11, 2014 at 1:30 am - Reply

    Very good advice. My favourite recipe for rolls or a smaller loaf is this one: 510g bread flour, 300g lukewarm filtered water, 2 tsp dried yeast, 1 Tbsp honey, 1 Tbsp macadamia oil, 1 tsp sea salt. I often make wholemeal or wholemeal spelt and use linseeds, sunflower seeds and chia seeds, so do add 1 ½ tsp bread improver.

  3. Jess Kell February 21, 2014 at 11:33 pm - Reply

    Thank you so much for your advice! After many MANY failed attempts I have managed to make perfect bread!
    I just wanted to add this little tip – my house is a bit cold and I found my dough wasn’t proving properly, so now I fill my thermomix bowl with hot tap water, pop the varoma on top and sit my dough in it, wrapped in my thermomat. It works a treat!

  4. Justine movliatti March 12, 2014 at 8:57 pm - Reply

    After getting bread that was way too dense for anything except stew I am off to try all these hints! Thankyou !

  5. Alan Bull June 4, 2014 at 11:01 am - Reply

    A quick tip on proofing, as well as covering the bowl with plastic wrap, then cover with a tea towel. Yeast prefers to work in the dark.

    • Peta
      Peta June 5, 2014 at 10:16 pm - Reply

      Thank you Allan! That is a great tip. Ill edit the post now to include that. Much appreciated.

  6. Mary June 24, 2014 at 9:25 pm - Reply

    Any advice on how to get fresh bread for breakfast without having to get up at 5am. Can I leave it to proof overnight?

    • Peta
      Peta June 25, 2014 at 9:47 am - Reply

      Proof overnight in the fridge. You can bake straight from the fridge if desired or knock down and rise an hour then bake.

  7. Holly McKew July 9, 2014 at 8:45 pm - Reply

    People should take this advice as gospel! Sooooo good! I haven’t bought store bought bread in weeks since I used this recipe! My two year old daughter had a sandwich at her grandparents that was store bought bread and she firmly said “ew, yuck!”

  8. Karen July 10, 2014 at 3:11 pm - Reply

    Peta, any tips for making fruit loaf? Or would you do the same as above?

    Thanks

  9. Nicole July 30, 2014 at 9:18 am - Reply

    Hi PETA,

    Excellent advice. I also put the wet ingredients into the thermomix heat to 37oC, then place the yeast in and do 3 mins at 37oc on soft then put in the dry ingredients and follow the recipe. Gives the dough a good start. Then place in a Tupperware bowl with tight lid for about 20mins in the sun. If it’s not sunny then next to the fire or in the microwave (not on). Usually doubles on size by then. I always place in a cold oven so the oven warming up also helps the dough. Always get beautiful fluffy bread no matter the type of flour I use!

  10. Hannah August 6, 2014 at 2:45 pm - Reply

    Great! We’ve been living on it for weeks. Is there an effective way to freeze the dough to cook later?

    • Peta
      Peta September 3, 2014 at 8:45 pm - Reply

      I freeze in an airtight container. You can wrap in cling wrap first too.

  11. Rebecca Rosato August 16, 2014 at 9:41 am - Reply

    Hi there. Are the yeast quantities for fresh yeast or instant? Also I’ve just made the first recipe (with 750g flour) and it’s massive as a loaf. Is the recipe for one or two loaves? If it’s for two how long should I cook for if I only put in singly? I only have one loaf tin at this stage.

    • Peta
      Peta August 30, 2014 at 6:09 pm - Reply

      These are for instant yeast.

      It makes 2 loaves of bread. I find I need 40 minutes for a single loaf. Each oven will vary though.

  12. Jayde August 18, 2014 at 3:32 pm - Reply

    Do you need to knock down the second time before baking or just let rise again and then bake as risen. Mine rose to a big round shape. It’s in baking now so we’ll see how it turns out.

    • Peta
      Peta August 30, 2014 at 6:06 pm - Reply

      I dont knock down after the second rise. Hope it turned out well.

  13. Josie August 18, 2014 at 4:17 pm - Reply

    This is fantastic! I have had sooo much trouble with trying to make a nice fluffy loaf or rolls in my Thermie. I checked the yeast first and then followed your recipe and the rolls are FANTASTIC! The are so soft and fluffy and rose heaps. Thank you so much for posting, I’ll definitely be making bread now 🙂

  14. Anne-marie Mulligan August 31, 2014 at 3:48 pm - Reply

    Hi there, I thought I posted something before but it has not appeared so forgive me if you get this one twice. I’m interested to know how much fresh yeast to add if I opt to use that instead of dry yeast. EG, above where the quantity is provided as 1.5 tsp yeast, how much fresh would I use? It’s great to see a post about soft bread. I know that was my Homer Simpson thought bubble moment (mmmmmmm breeeeeead) when I got mine.

    Thanks
    Anne-marie

    • Peta
      Peta September 3, 2014 at 8:38 pm - Reply

      Im not sure sorry as I don’t use fresh as I find it hard to source. A quick google may be able to help and give you a better answer than me 🙂

  15. Catherine September 7, 2014 at 10:41 am - Reply

    Hi, is there a quantity of oil in your bread at all? Thanks!

    • Peta
      Peta September 7, 2014 at 1:48 pm - Reply

      No only in the pizza dough recipe 🙂

  16. Sarah September 13, 2014 at 3:12 pm - Reply

    I made your cheese and bacon rolls for the first time today… Very tasty, but a little dense and doughy (I’m sure I did something wrong, haha!)… I kneaded for 7 mins, and the dough was very sticky and almost impossible to get out of thermie! Should I knead for longer? Or add some more flour so it’s not so sticky? Help! 🙂

    • Peta
      Peta September 13, 2014 at 9:47 pm - Reply

      No. The longer you knead the stickier it gets. Sticky dough is ok as it leads to a lighter end result. You can dust your bench and work a little flour in by hand if you wanted. If they were doughy Id suggest rising a little longer or cooking longer. Undercooked bread is quite doughy.

  17. Amanda September 13, 2014 at 4:12 pm - Reply

    Hey! I just finished making some rolls – which are delicious by the way! However, after letting them rise in a bowl covered in cling wrap, the dough was INCREDIBLY sticky! Is that normal? I’ve made other loaves that never had that issue… Can you help?

    Thanks,
    Amanda

    • Peta
      Peta September 13, 2014 at 9:46 pm - Reply

      It shouldn’t be overly sticky although sticky dough will give a lighter result 🙂

  18. Anna September 28, 2014 at 9:15 am - Reply

    Thanks for sharing these dough recipes. I make and bread at least weekly! You’re ace 🙂

  19. Fi October 3, 2014 at 3:38 pm - Reply

    Love love love this recipe! Thanks so much for sharing so many fab recipes. My fussy 4yo declares this the best bread ever and I try to make it a few times a week now. Store bought just isn’t the same anymore (unless it’s a fancy organic sourdough – which I might aim to make myself soon too!). Xx

  20. Sandra October 19, 2014 at 7:27 pm - Reply

    So I had a dough ready for bread and a small bit left over for ham & cheese scrolls. Then decided stuff it don’t need bread. If you can make scrolls you can make pizza so making pizza. My ten year old son said mum I can smell pizza. Then he said OMG is that the thick crust you told me about from dominos which didn’t turn out to be that thick? I said yep that’s true thick crust. My two boys and daughter (and hubby and I of course) scoffed it down. My middle boy who doesn’t usually think much of pizza ate two big slices. My ten year old said that is the best and most awesome pizza ever – I even scored a hug from him. Thanks Peta. You’re the best…….

  21. Stephanie October 21, 2014 at 6:02 pm - Reply

    Thanks the the tips and recipe! Worked really well and my bread tasted and felt just like the bakery’s! 🙂

  22. The Bush Gourmand October 25, 2014 at 2:21 pm - Reply

    I used your soft fluffy bread roll recipe (which I see is half of this one) yesterday to make a spelt loaf. Worked beautifully! So light and fluffy that I’m trying again today with this one and making a larger loaf. I’m using half spelt and half wheat to see how they’ll work together.

  23. Kirsty November 4, 2014 at 6:57 am - Reply

    AMAZING! First recipe I ever tried in my thermomix was a large loaf, and i’ve been making it every 2-3 days ever since! 😀

  24. raquel November 6, 2014 at 11:26 pm - Reply

    Awesome Peta, i´ve been researching this for a long time. I hate the bread made in the thermomixer, normally i do it in the breadmachine, it comes out fluffy, a delight. normally i premix the ingredients in the BM, then preset the timer to 8-9h later and the bread comes out great. simple bread, whole with seeds bread, brioche. in this method i use only 1 tea spoon of dry yeast, no need for more. but the BM is big i wouldn´t mind getting rid of it, but only if i have quality results. i´m sure these tips will make all the difference. i´m also looking for tips about cakes, the TM cakes always come out dense too, not air and fluffy. i´ll research your articles for it. if you never considered the subject, here´s a suggestion for one future article. congratulations, indeed, for your cooking skills and your in depth research of the topics.

  25. Mel December 1, 2014 at 8:05 am - Reply

    Thanks Peta, after many failed attempts I started experimenting with your bread recipe, as soon as I started using the improver, my breads started turning out amazingly. I’ve made bread, rolls, cheese and bacon rolls, and even whipped up a garlic cheese and herb twist yesterday afternoon for guests coming over. So exited!

  26. Jodie January 14, 2015 at 2:49 pm - Reply

    I have to say I was a bit skeptical…I’ve tried so many bread recipes in my Thermy but this is by far the best ever! Just like bakery bread, light and fluffy. Thank you so much! xx

  27. Jessica Watters January 28, 2015 at 7:41 am - Reply

    Hi Peta,

    Just a bread making virgin, do you use Fresh or Dried Yeast. If fresh where abouts do you get this from?

    • Peta
      Peta February 5, 2015 at 12:20 pm - Reply

      I used dried as fresh is so hard to find in my neck of the woods 🙂

      Delis often sell fresh yeast or health food shops.

  28. Nicole March 23, 2015 at 11:38 am - Reply

    I’ve never had a problem making bread in fact my brothers love my olive bread so much they request I bring it with me every visit.
    However reading your tips, Ill leave my bread in the tin to make it less crusty! ( I always take it out of the tin immediately, not sure why, just do).
    Recently come across kneading bread for 6 mins and it truly does make the bread rise higher and softer instead.

    I’ve come to your page today to make bread rolls for the first time. Fingers crossed they work for me. Thanks 🙂

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